Special Gatherings and Distinctive Lectures

Week 1:      Special Gatherings          Distinctive Lectures

Week 2:      Special Gatherings          Distinctive Lectures
 

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Week 1 Workshop Course Descriptions
 Special Gatherings   Distinctive Lectures  Literary & Performance Arts Music Courses 
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Download Common Ground on the Hill Catalog as a PDF HERE.

Traditions Week 1: June 26 - July 1

 

~ Special Gatherings: Week 1 ~

The Search for Common Ground

In this, our flagship class, we draw from our experience as artists and human beings to have a dialog arising from our life together here and in the larger society. In an atmosphere of trust and safety and inspired by song and story, we will listen to and learn from the voices of our sisters and brothers from communities represented in our circle. We gather at Common Ground on the Hill in our twenty-third summer in the midst of a world experiencing wars, growing nuclear threats, issues of immigration, continuing income disparity and ecological crises, racial crises and the continued threat of terror, both foreign and domestic. Yet, we also find ourselves at a time of potential for great, needed change. We shall discuss and consider what we are doing, as artists and individuals, to bring about the changes that we desire. To inspire us and to help focus our dialog, we will learn of the work of some of those in our circle. McDaniel College sociology professor Richard Smith will present his enlightening, interactive lecture concerning the Black Lives Matter movement. Journalist and songwriter David Morris will join us on Tuesday, leading a discussion sparked by his Monday evening Keynote, “Fake News and the Decline of Civility.” Iraq War USMC Veteran and singer-songwriter Josh Hisle will bring ongoing veterans issues to our discussion and shine a light on the Common Ground on the Hill Veterans Initiative. Palestinian musician Tareq Rantisi will bring to our circle the music that has nourished his culture for centuries and discuss how that music creates pathways to peace. Royce Anderson, former Executive Director of the International Center of Worcester, will help us understand the importance of Cultural Competence in our diverse world. Come to this class seeking knowledge and change, inspiring ourselves and others to walk that path.  Period 5 ~ Walt Michael ~ Facilitator

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World Music Community Chorus

Join us for this exciting new addition to the community choral tradition at Common Ground on the Hill! Spend a portion of your evenings at Traditions Week 1 laughing, singing, making friends, and adding your voice to a diverse selection of songs that is sure to delight. This hallmark of our program culminates in a Friday evening main stage performance in the beautiful WMC Alumni Hall Theater at McDaniel College. It is our distinguished honor to welcome Diana Sáez as Choir Leader (please read her instructor bio on our website to find out why). This workshop will be fun and engaging and it will include simple choral arrangements, rounds, world music, and circle singing. Reading music is not necessary. Not to be missed!   After dinner (6:45–7:45 PM) led by Diana Sáez 

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Keynote Lecture ~ David Morris

Fake News and the Decline of Civility

David Morris serves on the Common Ground on the Hill faculty as an award winning songwriter. This evening, he presents the Keynote Lecture as an award winning journalist. Deputy Managing Editor of The Kiplinger Letter and a Consultant for ABC News, David has spent much of his career as a wire service political reporter, including nearly 14 years with The Associated Press and as chief White House correspondent for Bloomberg News, covering Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. As citizens, we find ourselves in a new and evolving era of multiple news sources. Charges of “fake news” fly in all directions and the fourth estate is seemingly under siege. More than ever before, your personal news source(s) are most likely indicators of your political identity. What is journalism’s future? How shall we find common ground? How do we re-establish credible journalism in this age of fake news? This lecture is highly recommended to the entire Common Ground on the Hill community and is open to the public. Alumni Hall  Monday, June 26, 8 PM

NOTE: David Morris’s lecture will be the subject of Tuesday’s Search for Common Ground class. McDaniel Lounge  Tuesday, June 27, 4 PM.

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~ Distinctive Lectures: Week 1 ~

ArtSmart Teaching: Arts Integration in the Classroom

This class will help teachers discover methods to reach all of their students, no matter their learning style, using the arts. We will explore ways to use kinesthetic, visual and musical art forms to deliver the language arts curriculum, as well as the STEM subjects. Help your students reach deeper into their learning while you also have more fun teaching! Sally Rogers is an adjunct professor at Lesley University, where she also received her Master’s Degree in their Creative Arts in Learning program. She is also a Master Teaching Artist with the Connecticut Office of the Arts HOT Schools Initiative and Arts for Learning Connecticut (formerly Young Audiences, CT).  Period 2 ~ Sally Rogers

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Building Thoreau's Cabin "By the labor of my hands"

“I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only,” wrote Henry David Thoreau in 1854. Together in this class, we will use hand tools to build a facsimile of the single-story, timber frame building in which Thoreau lived for over two years, and about which he wrote in Walden. In the shade of the coffee trees at the Grove Studio, we will use hand saws, mallets, chisels, slicks and brace & bits to make timber framed pegged joints that will stand the test of time. At the same time, we will discuss Thoreau’s ideas about simplifying our lives, integrating some of his philosophy into the process. Proper use of hand tools, safety, and how to maintain sharp tools will be shared. We will be using treated, pre-sized lumber to make the building, but will also have a beam hewing demonstration as part of the class. Timber frame buildings built hundreds of years ago still stand today. Take part in the Grove community, working together to create this long-lasting, functional art, and give thought to simple living. “I borrowed an axe and went down to the woods by Walden Pond.” All levels; limited to students ages16 and older.  Periods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ~ Ken Koons

NOTE: Students may choose to take any or all class periods.

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The Common Ground of Music

This class reveals the Common Ground between traditional music and what most consider to be “classical music.” Through a guided listening experience and discussion, the class will explore how millennia of folk music have shaped centuries of music that the developed world considers to be the greatest, most profound ever composed. The story-telling, bardic traditions of several regions including Ireland, southern France, Turkey, and the Middle East will be shown to be the basis of opera. Folk dances will be shown as a key element of the Baroque suite and Classical symphony. Folk melodies and folk scales will be shown to be building blocks of the music of the Impressionists. The lives and works of renowned composers such as Corelli, Handel, Debussy, Ravel, Mozart, Puccini, Verdi and others will form the content of the class. Come to listen, discuss, and discover the Common Ground of music. This is a listening class intended to appeal to both non-musicians and musicians. No musical skill required.  Period 2 ~ Bill Troxler

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Exploring Diversity, Developing Cultural Competence

Today, more than ever, cultural diversity presents us with opportunities and challenges at the personal, professional, national, and global levels. This interactive workshop offers specific skills to help us interact with people of different ethnic, gender, socio-economic, religious, nationality, and political orientations.  Period 1 ~ Royce Anderson

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Gospel Music with Shelley Ensor

Join with Shelley Ensor as she leads a singing and film history of black gospel music. Starting with spirituals as popularized by the Fisk Jubilee Singers, moving into early gospel music personified by Thomas Dorsey, focusing on great gospel singers of the civil rights era such as Mahalia Jackson and Mavis Staples and finally highlighting contemporary icons such as Walter Hawkins, Hezekiah Walker and Fred Hammond, this class will be both informative and inspiring Period 2 ~ Shelley Ensor, Alice Dorsey

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Hearts and Minds Film

Common Ground on the Hill and the Delaware-based Hearts and Minds Film Initiative once again partner to examine film and digital media as tools for social change. We will view powerful examples of documentary film and other forms of digital media that address the most critical issues in our global society. This class allows us to discuss controversial issues in a constructive environment, with special attention to media literacy and the search for solutions. Each year, we discuss enormous changes throughout the world, exploring vast leaps in media and technology, and digesting the explosion of information that reflects and defines the human experience. In this digital age, how can we increase our ability to understand and engage in the world around us? How can technology empower us to become more active citizens? What kind of world do we want to live in and how can we focus our efforts to have a positive impact? ❖ Period 3 ~ Dan Collins

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Music & Healing: Body, Mind & Soul

The power of music to integrate and cure…is quite fundamental. It is the profoundest non-chemical medication. Oliver Sacks M.D. Awakenings

Most of us have personally experienced the healing power of music, either as listeners or dancers or players. And yet there are ways in which music is much more powerful than we can even imagine! Recent neuro-scientific studies demonstrate how music touches our memories, emotions, senses, motor system, and language in ways that the concept of “right brain/left brain” does not even begin to capture. Music is one of the most complex activities that human beings partake of--both as makers of music and as listeners. This is why people with dementia who do not know their own name or are not otherwise able to communicate are able to sing songs. We will share stories and songs; hear some of the latest remarkable findings in the emerging field of music and healing, drawing upon the work of Oliver Sacks, Daniel Levitin, and others; and engage in experiential exercises that will empower us to think outside of the box and encourage us to share our live music for healing in the world.  Period 3 ~ Jesse Palidofsky

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 Native American Tribal Arts: Its Motifs, Techniques and Meaning

Pre-Contact North America had over 355 native language families and hundreds more tribal communities—more diversity than most places on earth. Yet despite such wide differences in almost every area of human life, there are identifiable common elements in their artistic traditions. This course begins with the archaic and paleo foundations of native expressions. Discover and explore six major cultural areas and their traditions, tools and techniques, motifs and meaning, the materials utilized, and, finally, the what, why, how and purposes of native arts. This year's class will begin with the west coast native peoples and work our way eastward to the Atlantic and southeast. You may bring a native item for discussion. If you plan to take the class for credit, please bring a good book on American Indian Art and Architecture for your class text and reference.  Period 5 ~ Bobbie Little Bear

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Nonviolent Problem-Solving: Strategy, Script-breaking, and Disobedience

Explore the principles and the strategy of nonviolent social change and the lessons we can learn for everyday living. We will look in particular at examples of surprise in nonviolence – examples of unexpectedly breaking a script, a script that seemed to promise only violence. How is that done? Can it be learned? Let's see.  Period 2 ~ Charles Collyer and Pamela Zappardino

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Race: A Laughing Matter?

Historically, racial comedy has been used to enlighten Americans about systemic racism, racialized oppression, and the problems with racist stereotypes in American society. Participants will watch comedy sketches, understand the history of racial comedy, discuss contemporary issues and recognize the effectiveness of racial comedy today. The end result of this lecture series is to learn principles from comedy that will help us to have meaningful conversations about race and to work towards healing racial divides in our communities.  Period 4 ~ Richard Smith

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Social Responsibility in Science

Lead poisoning in Flint, Michigan, fraudulent claims connecting vaccines with Autism, and the immortal cells taken from Henrietta Lacks are just a few of the many examples in which science and society intersect. In such cases, what role do scientists have in ensuring the socially responsible use of technology and scientific knowledge? What choices are open to individuals and the general public? This course will use case studies, current events, and discussion to create a roadmap of the issues, and then, together, we will identify the stakeholders, barriers, and strategic points of intervention. Our goal is to find small steps, for scientists and non-scientists alike, that can enable scientific advancements to benefit the broader needs of society. Teachers are strongly encouraged to join this discussion, but teenagers and adults of all backgrounds are welcome.  Period 3 ~ Melanie Nilsson

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STARTALK Integrating Chinese Language, Culture & Community

Offering an innovative, supportive, differentiated, and academically rigorous learning environment, individuals interested in teaching Chinese will improve their understanding of second language acquisition theories and implement high-yield teaching and learning strategies. By the end of the course, participants will improve their ability to communicate current and best theories of Second Language Acquisition; implement sound language teaching approaches and methodologies; and design curricula that moves students toward the attainment of carefully planned course, unit and lesson performance objectives. NOTE: Fluency in Chinese and an interest in teaching Chinese in K-12 settings is required. This course begins during Weeks 1 and continues in Week 2.  Periods 1-5 ~ Co-Taught by Various Instructors

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Stories of the Civil Rights Movement

Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat; Martin Luther King, Jr. had a dream. Many know these basic facts about the American Civil Rights Movement. Some know a bit about the movement and its campaigns. Few people, however, know the personal stories of the people who were the movement, the people who made it happen, and the places where they stood strong. Pam and Charlie from our Zepp Center (with some help from their friends) will share the stories collected over 20 years of travel across the south, studying the movement and meeting the people who lived it. Stories of Amelia Boynton Robinson, John Lewis, Viola Liuzzo, Bernard LaFayette, Dorothy Cotton, J.L. Chestnut, and more will bring the movement alive for you, and give you new insight into the footsoldiers - and leaders - of the movement, and why these stories are relevant today.  Period 3 ~ Charles Collyer & Pamela Zappardino

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The Veterans Initiative

This is the fifth year of the Common Ground on the Hill Veterans Initiative. In this trusting and supportive environment, military veteran scholarship recipients as well as other students and instructors will share and check in with one another, reflecting on the issues that affect their lives and the role that the arts can play in nurturing veterans and society as a whole. We will continue to explore how we may work together to build the Initiative into a national year-round arts program. The class will include song, story, writing and film. Come to this class prepared to learn and grow.  Period 2 ~ Josh Hisle, Dan Collins

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Special Gatherings and Distinctive Lectures

Week 1:      Special Gatherings          Distinctive Lectures

Week 2:     Special Gatherings          Distinctive Lectures

 
 

Download Common Ground on the Hill Catalog as a PDF HERE.

Traditions Week 2: July 3 - July 8

 

~ Special Gatherings: Week 2 ~

The Search for Common Ground

In this, our flagship class, we draw from our experience as artists and human beings to have a dialog arising from our life together here and in the larger society. In an atmosphere of trust and safety and inspired by song and story, we will listen to and learn from the voices of our sisters and brothers from communities represented in our circle. We gather at Common Ground on the Hill in our twenty-third summer in the midst of a world experiencing wars, growing nuclear threats, issues of immigration, continuing income disparity and ecological crises, racial crises and the continued threat of terror, both foreign and domestic. Yet, we also find ourselves at a time of potential for great, needed change. We shall discuss and consider what we are doing, as artists and individuals, to bring about the changes that we desire. To inspire us and to help focus our dialog, we will learn of the work of some of those in our circle. Storytellers Sheila Arnold Jones and Pun Plamondon will be joined by singer Jonathan Gilmore in exploring social justice through story telling and song. Monday evening’s keynote lecturer, Chad Buterbaugh, will join us on Tuesday to shine a light on the Maryland State Arts Council’s Folk and Traditional Arts program and its importance to our diverse Maryland communities. Steve Nida, Chair of the Psychology Departmentat the Citadel,will visit the subject of his five-day class on Ostracism and Bullying. Members of the STARTALK summer workshops, teachers of critical-need foreign languages, will share their experiences of diversity and community in the United States. Shura Wallin, of the Green Valley Samaritans, will bring us up to speed with the latest realities of immigration along our southern border, including the upcoming 5th Annual Common Ground on the Border and Border Issues Fair.Come to this class seeking knowledge and change, inspiring ourselves and others to walk that path.  Period 5 ~ Walt Michael, Facilitator

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Interracial Gospel Choir & Orchestra

Everyone attending and instructing is urged to take part in this daily after-dinner workshop. This community event is what sparked Common Ground on the Hill. It embodies our reason for existing here in this place. Horn players are welcome!  
After dinner (6:45 - 7:45 PM) led by Jonathan Gilmore with Professor Louie, accompanist

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Keynote ~ Dr. Chad Buterbaugh
Safeguarding and Nurturing the Traditional Arts in Maryland

Common Ground on the Hill’s mission is to seek common ground through teaching, learning and sharing the traditional arts. While federal funding for the arts is being threatened in the current political climate, the State of Maryland continues with its dedicated, robust support for a wide spectrum of the arts.
Chad Buterbaugh is a folklorist trained in oral tradition, ethnographic methods, and public folklore. He is Director of the Maryland Traditions folklife program at the Maryland State Arts Council working to identify, support, and safeguard Maryland folklife through grants, heritage awards, and the annual Maryland Folklife Festival. Enjoy this presentation as Chad highlights a selection of the wonderful traditional artists who make up the rich artistic identity of our state. This lecture is highly recommended to the entire Common Ground on the Hill community and is open to the public. Alumni Hall Monday, July 3, 8 PM

NOTE: Dr. Buterbaugh’s lecture will be the subject of Tuesday’s Search for Common Ground class, McDaniel Lounge. ❖ Monday, July 4, 4 PM

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~ Distinctive Lectures: Week 2 ~

Building Thoreau's Cabin

“I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only,” wrote Henry David Thoreau in 1854. Together in this class, we will use hand tools to build a facsimile of the single-story, timber frame building in which Thoreau lived for over two years, and about which he wrote in Walden. In the shade of the coffee trees at the Grove Studio, we will use hand saws, mallets, chisels, slicks and brace & bits to make timber framed pegged joints that will stand the test of time. At the same time, we will discuss Thoreau’s ideas about simplifying our lives, integrating some of his philosophy into the process. Proper use of hand tools, safety, and how to maintain sharp tools will be shared. We will be using treated, pre-sized lumber to make the building, but will also have a beam hewing demonstration as part of the class. Timber frame buildings built hundreds of years ago still stand today. Take part in the Grove community, working together to create this long-lasting, functional art, and give thought to simple living. “I borrowed an axe and went down to the woods by Walden Pond.” All levels; limited to students ages16 and older.  Periods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ~ Ken Koons

NOTE: Students may choose to take any or all class periods.

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The Common Ground of Music

This class reveals the Common Ground between traditional music and what most consider to be “classical music.” Through a guided listening experience and discussion, the class will explore how millennia of folk music have shaped centuries of music that the developed world considers to be the greatest, most profound ever composed. The story-telling, bardic traditions of several regions including Ireland, southern France, Turkey, and the Middle East will be shown to be the basis of opera. Folk dances will be shown as a key element of the Baroque suite and Classical symphony. Folk melodies and folk scales will be shown to be building blocks of the music of the Impressionists. The lives and works of renowned composers such as Corelli, Handel, Debussy, Ravel, Mozart, Puccini, Verdi and others will form the content of the class. Come to listen, discuss, and discover the Common Ground of music. This is a listening class intended to appeal to both non-musicians and musicians. No musical skill required.   
Period 1 ~ Bill Troxler

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Conquering the Inevitable CANCELLED

With advance preparation for the inevitable, thinking about one's death is not a morbid subject. Preparation can bring a sense of comfort and final fulfillment as you wish it to be. We will demystify funeral homes, various ways bodies are prepared, types of cremation, green burials, organ donation, do-it-yourself family prep and home burials. We'll explore death and dying customs from other cultures and the important steps in the transition from life to death. This class does not espouse a particular religious or spiritual view.  Period 1 ~ Sakim

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Contemporary Native American Philosophy & Religion in the Southeast CANCELLED

This course creates a foundation for understanding the vibrant Southeastern Native American cultures of today and their philosophy. It includes an introduction to Native languages, ceremonies and their public and private roles, the Great Duality of life and its many expressions, and the spiritual nature of foods, herbs and healing. We will touch on art, music, death and dying, family life and child-rearing. Time and interest permitting, we’ll try our hand at dance and crafts, and gain a taste of ceremony and food. This class is very interactive and hands-on with related text materials provided to all students. If taken for credit, please contact the instructor in advance for selected reading materials. There is no course fee, but contributions are welcome to offset the cost of materials and foods to be sampled.  Period 5 ~ Sakim

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Exploring China via Chinese 

Ever wondered what it would be like to paint your name in Chinese? Have you ever watched a Chinese film and found yourself wishing you could pick out a few words? Do you wish you could go into a Chinese restaurant or store and surprise the waiter by ordering in Mandarin? Ever wondered why elevators don’t stop on the 4th floor in China? China is not only the world’s most populous country, the Chinese Diaspora is also one of the largest and most global. Ties between Americans and Chinese are increasing through travel, immigration, commerce, and social networking. With its booming economy and vibrant culture, more people are recognizing the need to develop a deeper understanding of China’s people, language, and culture(s). Join this class for an exciting week of exploration where you will be treated to the sights, tastes, art, and culture of China while gaining an introductory knowledge of basic terms and phrases you can use when visiting this remarkable land (or even your local Chinatown or market).   Period 3 ~ Co-Taught by Various Instructors

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Exploring Diversity, Developing Cultural Competence

Today, more than ever, cultural diversity presents us with opportunities and challenges at the personal, professional, national, and global levels. This interactive workshop offers specific skills to help us interact with people of different ethnic, gender, socio-economic, religious, nationality, and political orientations.  
Period 3 ~ Royce Anderson

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Gender - Understanding the Complexities of a Seemingly Simple Term
The past few years have been marked by controversy related to gender and gender identity. In this course, we’ll tackle the concept of gender starting with the basics (sex vs gender & the LGBTQ alphabet soup). We’ll quickly move to more complex issues (gender identity vs sexuality). We’ll then discuss the current social, political, legal, and civil rights issues related to gender from men’s and women’s rights, to same sex marriage, to religious “right of refusal” laws, to transgender rights and existing debates around these topics.  
Period 4 ~ Roxanna Harlow

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Hearts and Minds Film

Common Ground on the Hill and the Delaware-based Hearts and Minds Film Initiative once again partner to examine film and digital media as tools for social change. We will view powerful examples of documentary film and other forms of digital media that address the most critical issues in our global society. This class allows us to discuss controversial issues in a constructive environment, with special attention to media literacy and the search for solutions. Each year we discuss enormous changes throughout the world, exploring vast leaps in media and technology, and digesting the explosion of information that reflects and defines the human experience. In this digital age how can we increase our ability to understand and engage in the world around us? How can technology empower us to become more active citizens? What kind of world do we want to live in and how can we focus our efforts to have a positive impact?   Period 3 ~
Dan Collins


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Hidden Voices

Common Ground has offered a variety of courses on roots traditions and the people who have made them great. But never before have many hidden voices, vital to their traditions, been heard. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer folks make important impacts on traditional music, but we rarely hear all the meaning in their stories. Why? In this course, we will uncover some of these previously hidden people and the music they made, especially in the blues, Appalachian mountain music, gospel, folk counterculture, and Celtic music. We will also explore themes of defiance, fear, secrets, desire, liberation, and acceptance. The music and ideas of Bessie Smith, Brían Ó hAirt, the Down Home Divas, Holly Near, and many others will make appearances as we break down stereotypes and learn from them and from each other. Everyone is welcome to join the discussion, regardless of age, gender, or orientation.   Period 2 ~
Ryan Koons

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Look & Listen: The Beauty of the Blues
Blues is the underpinning of much of our best popular music: folk, jazz, rock, soul, r&b. Using classic and rare recordings and film, this multi-media course is guaranteed to open your ears and eyes to the blues and its mammoth impact on American culture. Count on a good time when Cary, producer of the syndicated radio show “Blues from the Red Rooster Lounge” and former editor and publisher of Blues Access magazine, shares his lifetime of experiences as a fan, radio host and magazine publisher, along with a bevy of examples from his vast audio and video collection. If you thought the blues was a bummer, think again!   Period 2 ~
Cary Wolfson

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Martin's Dream: Black Culture and the Arts after the Civil Rights Movement

Have you wondered about the generations that followed after Martin Luther King? How did the music before and after affect the Black community? Who is the Black community? What is Post Traumatic Slave Disorder? Using music, poetry and fine art to study the ongoing civil rights movement, this class will take you on a multimedia journey through "the souls of Black folk." We will explore the roots of hip hop and discuss its negative and positive concepts. We will discuss taboos including the "N" word, answer difficult questions, and explore stereotypes that plague Black people. All are welcome to this unique class—prepare to sing, dance, write, and discuss the experiences of the Afrikan/Blacks in America while discovering yourself as well.  Period 4 ~ Jonathan Gilmore

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Migration Sketches: Music of the Diasporas

Migrations resulting from war, persecution, famine, commerce and other factors have characterized much of human history and continue to do so. This timely lecture, discussion, and performance program focuses on immigrants, migrations and their related music. Tim Porter and Joe Selly will discuss and perform music associated with these mass movements of people. These include: the exodus of people now known as Gypsies or Roma more than a thousand years ago from Northern India to Europe culminating in Django Reinhardt's subversive gypsy jazz during the Nazi occupation of France; the Great Migration from the US South to Urban centers in the first half of the twentieth century that resulted in the Harlem Renaissance; the economy-driven movement of people and music from the Caribbean to the US; the departure of people under physical and political duress from Europe to the US and their music whose influence can be seen in Gershwin's "It Ain't Necessarily So"; the famine induced movement of people from Ireland with their music during the nineteenth century; the “Middle Passage” of enslaved people and the music flowing from the African Diaspora; and, from many experiences, music that expresses the hopes of those who are "Dreamers". Tim Porter on mandolin and Joe Selly on guitar lead the discussion and demonstrate.  Period 4 ~ Tim Porter, Joe Selly

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The National Security State Through Film

Since 1945, the United States has been routinely at war or violently interventionist, from Latin America to Asia, through Africa and into the Greater Middle East.  This “Long War” has been managed by the concomitant rise of a Presidential National Security State of notably expanded secrecy, surveillance, and war powers.  Through film, feature and documentary, this course introduces aspects of this larger story.  Films shall be drawn from among the following: On the Beach; The Day the Earth Stood Still; Fail-Safe; Seven Days in May; In the Year of the Pig; Hearts and Minds; The War at Home; Inside the CIA; The Most Dangerous Man in America; In Country; Remember My Lai; Winter Soldier; The Trials of Henry Kissinger; Missing; The Falcon and the Snowman; Citizen 4;  Body of War; Top Secret America; The Torture Question; Frost/Nixon; Bobby; One Thousand Pictures; The Fog of War; Path to War; Lioness; Buying the War; Following Antigone; The Invisible War; In Country; The Messenger; Afghanistan-A Progressive Country; Following Antigone; Standard Operating Procedure; The Ground Truth; School of the Americas; The Man Nobody Knew: CIA Spymaster William Colby.   Periods 3 & 4 ~ Guy Alchon

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Nonviolent Problem-Solving: Strategy, Script-breaking, and Disobedience

Explore the principles and the strategy of nonviolent social change and the lessons we can learn for everyday living. We will look in particular at examples of surprise in nonviolence – examples of unexpectedly breaking a script, a script that seemed to promise only violence. How is that done? Can it be learned? Let's see.  Period 2 ~
Charles Collyer & Pamela Zappardino

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Ostracisim, Social Exclusion, and Bullying

Bullying, particularly among children and adolescents, has received a great deal of attention recently from educators, parents, and even lawmakers—and anti-bullying efforts seem to be everywhere. A large body of psychological research suggests, however, that ostracism may actually be even more damaging than bullying. Regardless of which is worse, it is clear that both types of social behavior are harmful. This class will begin with a look at the research on social ostracism—how it works, its impact, and its consequences. With that foundation, the class will then consider strategies for countering the effects of ostracism, exclusion, and bullyingthrough interventions and public policy.You will emerge from the week with an understanding of how the kindness of a single individual can often be the key to negating the impact of such behaviors, reinforcing the theme that—even when standing alone—every single one of us has the power to make a difference. NOTE: A significant portion of the research that serves as the basis of this class has involved children and adolescents, thus making it a particularly appropriate selection for teachers and educators.  Period 1 ~
Steve Nida

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Samaritans at the Border, Immigrants Among Us

The United States has always been known as a country of immigrants. You need only to turn to the revered Statue of Liberty and read the chiseled words, “Give me your tired, your weak, your huddled masses...” to understand that immigration is central to us as a nation. In the last ten years there has been unprecedented immigration along our southern border, as “people made poor” from the effects of globalization have been pushed from their countries and pulled into the United States to work in our gardens, hotels, and kitchens. This workshop will focus on globalization and how it affects communities which in turn stimulate immigration into our First World country. It will lift up the plight of the migrant and illuminate the deep instinct of survival and love of family. It will describe and lay out the rich culture and climate of the borderlands; and it will tell the story of a humanitarian group called the Samaritans, who give food, water, and medical care to those whose lives are on the line. Many from the Common Ground on the Hill community have visited the Samaritans in Arizona to further understand their mission and work.   Period 1 ~
Shura Wallin, Randy Mayer

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STARTALK Integrating Chinese Language, Cultures & Community

For those interested in teaching Chinese. Learn current and best theories of Second Language Acquisition; implement sound language teaching approaches and methodologies; and design curricula that moves students toward the attainment of carefully planned course, unit and lesson performance objectives in an innovative, supportive, differentiated, and academically rigorous learning environment. NOTE: Fluency in Chinese and an interest in teaching Chinese in K-12 settings is required. This course begins during Week 1 and concludes in Week 2.  Periods 1-5 ~ Co-Taught by Various Instructors

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Stories of the Civil Rights Movement

Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat; Martin Luther King, Jr. had a dream.  Many know these basic facts about the American Civil Rights Movement.  Some know a bit about the movement and its campaigns.  Few people, however, know the personal stories of the people who were the movement, the people who made it happen, and the places where they stood strong.   Pam and Charlie from our Zepp Center (with some help from their friends) will share the stories collected over 20 years of travel across the south, studying the movement and meeting the people who lived it.  Stories of Amelia Boynton Robinson, John Lewis, Viola Liuzzo, Bernard LaFayette, Dorothy Cotton, JL Chestnut, and more will bring the movement alive for you, and give you new insight into the footsoldiers - and leaders - of the movement, and into why these stories are relevant today.  This coure is also offered in Week I.  Period 3 ~
Charles Collyer & Pamela Zappardino

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Traditions Today: Community Installation

Combining all disciplines, the course will consider the relation of traditional processes to our lives today. Through group discussion we will define traditions, look into the ways in which we use traditions today, and the significance of these lasting methods. An introduction to installation, performance, and community art will lead into a group collaboration(s). These may take the form of a celebration, parade, service, environment alteration, or performance on campus to include fellow members of the Common Ground on the Hill community in the investigations of traditions today.  Period 5 ~
Stevie Dissinger

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Veterans Initiative

This is the fifth year of the Common Ground on the Hill Veterans Initiative. In this trusting and supportive environment, military veteran scholarship recipients as well as other students and instructors will share and check in with one another, reflecting on the issues that affect their lives and the role that the arts can play in nurturing veterans and society as a whole. We will continue to explore how we may work together to build the Initiative into a national year-round arts program. The class will include song, story, writing and film. Come to this class prepared to learn and grow.  Period 2 ~
Josh Hisle, Dan Collins, Tim Scully

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Why Science and Technology Need the Arts

Innovation in science, technology, engineering, and math (the “STEM” fields), requires skills that are readily cultivated in the arts; skills such as creativity, communication, unconventional thinking, and an appreciation of different viewpoints. Incorporating the arts into STEM fields has been popularized by the STEAM movement; STEAM represents STEM in which an “A” for art is embedded. In this course, we will discuss the history of the STEAM movement and explore other useful intersections among these disciplines. All perspectives are welcomed as we chart this interdisciplinary territory and see what the arts can offer STEM, and what STEM can offer the arts. Teachers are strongly encouraged to join this discussion, but teenagers and adults of all backgrounds are welcome.  Period 4 ~
Melanie Nilsson

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